Royal Navy Gallery
HMS Ocean, a Landing Platform Helicopter, and various other ships are shown along side at Plymouth Naval Base.
The Royal Navy Type 23 Frigate HMS Somerset arrived in the Pool of London on Wednesday 15th March to berth alongside HMS Belfast for a four-day visit. Commissioned in 1996, this will be the first time HMS Somerset has visited the capital.
HMS Bulwark, took part in an operational tasking off the coast of Southern Iraq.
The Ship’s Company and Carrier Air Group of HMS Illustrious took time out of their busy schedules to wish Her Majesty The Queen a very Happy 80th Birthday. The Fleet Flagship and her Task Group were transiting the Red Sea on their way to the Indian Ocean .
The Ship’s Company and Carrier Air Group of HMS Illustrious took time out of their busy schedules to wish Her Majesty The Queen a very Happy 80th Birthday. The Fleet Flagship and her Task Group were transiting the Red Sea on their way to the Indian Ocean for a 4-month deployment.
500 of the ship’s personnel from HMS Illustrious, lined out on the flight deck to spell out the message “England Expects”, as an encouragement to the England football team on the day of their first match in the 2006 World Cup in Germany.
500 of the ship’s personnel from HMS Illustrious, lined out on the flight deck to spell out the message “England Expects”, as an encouragement to the England football team on the day of their first match in the 2006 World Cup in Germany.
The Portsmouth based Type 23 Frigate, HMS Iron Duke carrying out Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with RFA Wave Ruler, whilst carrying out the duties of the Atlantic Patrol Task (North) ATP (N). The ship’s primary tasking is Counter Drug Operations in conjunction with a wide variety of law-enforcement agencies, primarily the United States Coast Guard (USCG). The ship is also on standby to provide Disaster and Humanitarian Relief if necessary, and her presence in the area contributes to the wider security of the region.
The Portsmouth based Type 23 Frigate, HMS Iron Duke carrying out Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with RFA Wave Ruler, whilst carrying out the duties of the Atlantic Patrol Task (North) ATP (N). The ship’s primary tasking is Counter Drug Operations in conjunction with a wide variety of law-enforcement agencies, primarily the United States Coast Guard (USCG). The ship is also on standby to provide Disaster and Humanitarian Relief if necessary, and her presence in the area contributes to the wider security of the region.
The Portsmouth based Type 23 Frigate, HMS Iron Duke carrying out Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with RFA Wave Ruler, whilst carrying out the duties of the Atlantic Patrol Task (North) ATP (N). The ship’s primary tasking is Counter Drug Operations in conjunction with a wide variety of law-enforcement agencies, primarily the United States Coast Guard (USCG). The ship is also on standby to provide Disaster and Humanitarian Relief if necessary, and her presence in the area contributes to the wider security of the region.
HMS Bulwark had just completed an overnight journey from Beirut to Limassol Port in Cyprus. Where it dropped off over 1000 assisted departees, as part of Operation Highbrow. The aim of Operation Highbrow is to provide assistance with the departure of British passport holders and those with duel nationality. This was as a result of conflict, involving Israel and elements of the Hezbollah group based in Southern Lebanon. Israel’s response to Hezbollah’s rocket attacks on Israeli towns, has involved civilian casualties in some Lebanese towns. European governments, including Britain, have offered their citizens help to flee the country.
HMS Superb, a Swiftsure Class Attack Submarine, emerged from a period of deep maintenance at HMNB(Clyde). The support period was followed by three hugely successful weeks of operational sea training with Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST) staff embarked. The submarine was cleared for operations and was deployed in the later part of the summer. The photograph shows the Type 45 Destroyer, HMS Daring, conducting sea trials in the Scottish exercise areas. The shipÕs Submarine Photographic Team (SPT) took the photograph through HMS SuperbÕs search periscope.
HMS Campbeltown is pictured operating in the Red Sea in January 2007. The ship’s Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) can be seen approaching in the background.
A Merlin helicopter from HMS Ark Royal hovers in the foreground whilst the Duke Class Type 23 Frigate HMS Sutherland, sails past behind.
Veteran Royal Navy warship HMS Dumbarton Castle flys her ‘Paying Off Pennant’ as she returns to her Portsmouth home for the last time before retiring from service. The patrol vessel, which joined the fleet in 1982, sailed into the Naval Base today (22/11) after completing her last deployment as the Falkland Islands guard ship. She has been protecting the islands and UK territorial waters. In the Royal Navy a paying-off pennant is flown to mark the end of a ship’s commission. Traditionally the pennant is the same length as the ship, and somewhat longer if the commission has been extended. It is said to have originated in the 19th century when all cleaning rags were tied together and hoisted as a sign that they were finished with.
Image shows HMS Ark Royal in the distance in company with HMS Talent as the submarine conducts a high-line transfer with a Merlin helicopter from 824 Squadron off the Northern Coast of Norway in Vestfjorden. HMS Ark Royal with 824 Merlin Squadron embarked was operating off the coast of Norway during Exercise Armatura Borealis 08. Ex AB08 is taking place over the period 25 Feb – 8 Mar 08. One of the main aims of the exercise is for HMS Ark Royal to conduct ASW training with 824 Squadron while acting as a Forces Anti-Submarine Warfare Commander (FASWC) for Task Force 445.
United States Marine Corps (USMC) AV8B Harriers conduct fixed wing work on HMS Illustrious ahead of Operation Bold Step. At the rear of the flight deck, an Osprey MV-22 aircraft can just be seen. AV8B Harrier Jets from the United States Marine Corps
HMS Tireless is shown after surfacing in the North Pole ice cap region. The crew are waving to a supply plane as it prepares to land at the US Navy’s Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS). HMS Tireless, is a Trafalgar Class Nuclear-Powered Attack Submarine (SSN) Fleet Submarine.
HMS Lancaster, a Type 23 Frigate, is shown as she sails across Gareloch on her way to HM Naval Base Clyde for a short period alongside at Faslane Naval Base.
HMS Endurance, an Antarctic Patrol Ship, photographed from one of her Lynx helicopters cutting through the ice as they flew over the Ice Gullet, Antarctic. HMS EnduranceÕs mission is to patrol and survey the Antarctic and South Atlantic maintaining a UK presence and supporting the international community of the Antarctic.
HMS Endurance, an Antarctic Patrol Ship, is shown patrolling off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsular, with a colony of Gentoo Penguins
HMS Nottingham, a Type 42 Destroyer, photographed whilst in transit to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
HMS Ark Royal is pictured operating off the Northern Coast of Norway in Vestfjorden, during Exercise Armatura Borealis 08.
Members of the Flight Deck Party onboard a snow covered HMS Ark Royal, are shown tending the Merlins of 824 NAS during Exercise Armatura Borealis 08. HMS Ark Royal, with 824 Squadron embarked operated off the coast of Norway during Exercise Armatura Borealis 08.
HMS Vigilant, a Vanguard Class submarine, is shown alongside No. 10 berth HM Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde in this stunning twilight shot. She had recently returned to her home port, Faslane Naval Base, after a successful operational patrol.
Photograph shows the Fleet SSN HMS Tireless transiting the Clyde estuary on her way to sea after a short period alongside at HMNB Clyde. HMS Tireless is the 3rd of 7 Trafalgar Class SSN submarines, based in Devonport, Plymouth. Following the demise of the Second Submarine Squadron, HMS Tireless is now part of a new organisation known as Commodore Devonport Flotilla (COMDEVFLOT), which supports all ships and submarines based in Devonport.
A Harrier GR7 of 800 Naval Air Squadron (NAS) is shown firing decoy flares. This Harrier GR7 was part of the first detachment of Harriers to 800 NAS from Royal Air Force Cottesmore and were taking part in Operation Aquila at the time.
The ‘Duke’ Class, Type 23 frigate HMS Northumberland glides over the Great Barrier Reef, Australia during her 2001 deployment to the area.
Type 42 Destroyer HMS Edinburgh anchored in San Carlos Bay, Falkland Islands for a memorial service and wreath laying ceremony.
Type 42 destroyer HMS Edinburgh on her way from Stanley to Fitzroy in the Falkland Islands.
The Small Fleet Tanker, RFA Gold Rover at anchor in San Carlos Bay, Falkland Islands.
HMS Ark Royal at the head of a convoy during Exercise Joint Warrior. She is followed by (left to right) HMS Somerset, HMS Gloucester and HMS Bulwark as they transit the Straits of Mull, Northwest Scotland.
Type 45 destroyer HMS Daring conducting acceptance trials at high speed off the west coast of Scotland.
Pictured from astern is the Albion Class Assault Ship HMS Bulwark. The vessel was operating close to the Scottish mainland during Operation Wader part of the wider Exercise Joint Warrior in October 2008. Exercise Joint Warrior was a large international NATO marine exercise carried out over two weeks which was designed to develop the ability of aircraft, warships and submarines to operate as part of a multi-national task group in a complex and demanding operational environment.
RFA Mounts Bay is a Landing Ships Dock (Auxillary) which replaced its predecessor the Landing Ship Logistic (LSL) vessel RFA Sir Galahad. The ship is more than twice the size of Sir Galahad and is designed to transport troops, vehicles, stores and equipment around the World. The ship is manned by personnel from the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.
HMS Illustrious pictured on Exercise Joint Warrior 2008. Exercise Joint Warrior provides a multi-threat environment to facilitate a joint collective training for UK, NATO & allied units and their staffs in preparation for employment as part of a combined joint force. The countries that took part were Sweden, UK, Norway, Denmark, Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, France, New Zealand & US.
Type 23 frigate HMS Portland at speed and at action stations during transit of the potentially volatile Bab-el-Mandeb Straits between Yemen and Djibouti, Africa at the narrow south end of the Red Sea.
The Royal Navy’s Antarctic Survey Vessel HMS Endurnace during her patrol of the Antarctic Peninsula early in 2007. HMS Endurance is the Royal NavyÕs Ice Patrol ship whose function is to support British interests in Antarctic waters, especially around the Antarctic Peninsula. In addition she assists the British Antarctic Survey in carrying out its scientific research programs. She is fitted with modern hydrographic surveying equipment, which is put to good effect in waters which are still largely uncharted, and the data that is gathered is processed by the Hydrographic Office.
The Royal Navy’s Antarctic Survey Vessel HMS Endurance during her patrol of the Antarctic Peninsula early in 2007. HMS Endurance is the Royal NavyÕs Ice Patrol ship whose function is to support British interests in Antarctic waters, especially around the Antarctic Peninsula. In addition she assists the British Antarctic Survey in carrying out its scientific research programs. She is fitted with modern hydrographic surveying equipment, which is put to good effect in waters which are still largely uncharted, and the data that is gathered is processed by the Hydrographic Office.
HMS Ark Royal sails into Glen Mallan, Scotland. The Royal Navy’s flagship paid a fleeting visit to the Clyde Estuary.
A sailor forming part of a ceremonial guard stands to attention as HMS Dragon is launched in the background. HMS Dragon was launched at BVT Surface Fleet Ltd Govan, Scotland to a fanfare of music and balloons in November 2008. She now faces an extensive fitting out and acceptance trials period before entering service with the Royal Navy. HMS Dragon is the second in the class of Type 45 destroyers, following HMS Daring. The air defence ships are amongst the most technologically advanced of their kind and will eventually replace Type 42 destroyers in the Fleet.
HMS Dragon was launched at BVT Surface Fleet Ltd Govan, Scotland to a fanfare of music and balloons in November 2008. She now faces an extensive fitting out and acceptance trials period before entering service with the Royal Navy. HMS Dragon is the second in the class of Type 45 destroyers, following HMS Daring. The air defence ships are amongst the most technologically advanced of their kind and will eventually replace Type 42 destroyers in the Fleet.
HMS Dragon was launched at BVT Surface Fleet Ltd Govan, Scotland to a fanfare of music and balloons in November 2008. She now faces an extensive fitting out and acceptance trials period before entering service with the Royal Navy. HMS Dragon is the second in the class of Type 45 destroyers, following HMS Daring. The air defence ships are amongst the most technologically advanced of their kind and will eventually replace Type 42 destroyers in the Fleet.
HMS Daring, the Royal Navy’s first Type 45 Destroyer pulls a tight turn at sea following acceptance trials into service.
HMS Illustrious is pictured operating at sea recovering Sea King helicopters to her deck. The helicopters belong to 848 Naval Air Squadron and are capable of deploying personnel and stores.
Type 23 frigate HMS Lancaster arrives home in Portsmouth in February 2009 following a successful six month deployment to the Middle East. Amongst other duties the ship protected vital Iraqi oil assets from attack, helped to train Iraqi maritime forces and provided an essential role in anti piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden.
HMS Invincible returns to massive celebrations following the Falklandís Conflict in 1982. Lined up on deck are Sea King helicopters from 820 Naval Air Squadron and Sea Harrier FRS1 aircraft from 800 Naval Air Squadron. 2009 is the Centenary anniversary of the Royal Navy’s Fleet Air Arm.
HMS Bulwark is pictured sailing from her home port of Devonport to spearhead one of the Royal Navy’s largest deployments of recent years, Taurus 09. Under drizzly skies, HMS Bulwark waved goodbye to family and friends for the six months she will spend as Flagship to Commander UK Amphibious Task Group.
HMS Bulwark is pictured sailing from her home port of Devonport, Plymouth to spearhead one of the Royal Navy’s largest deployments of recent years, Taurus 09. Under drizzly skies, HMS Bulwark waved goodbye to family and friends for the six months she will spend as Flagship to Commander UK Amphibious Task Group.
Type 23 frigate HMS Portland (foreground) is pictured exercising with the US Navy’s Arleigh Burke class destroyer USS Mahan. Held in the Gulf of Aden, the exercise demonstrated each others boarding capabilities and served to strengthen US/UK relations further.
HMS Illustrious off the coast of Great Britain. The aircraft carrier was at sea with Naval Strike Wing (NSW) Harrier aircraft embarked. The Naval Strike Wing is formed of 800 Sqn and 801 Sqn, who are based at RAF Cottesmore, home of the Joint Force Harrier. Pictured are three NSW Harriers preparing for take off from HMS Illustrious’ flight deck, whilst one is seen leaving the ski slope.
. Greenwich, London. HMS Illustrious moored on the River Thames in Greenwich on Thursday 7th May 2009 as part of the Fly Navy 100 celebrations. A flypast was provided by aircraft both fixed wing and rotary over the ship as the salute was taken on board by HRH The Duke of York. Image shows the carrier in the early morning light.
A Royal Marine Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) Landing Craft is pictured arriving at Tregantle Beach in Cornwall. Elements of 9 Assault Squadron Royal Marines (9 ASRM) were training under the auspices of Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST) undertaking a four day exercise called “South West Cheetah”.
The Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious is illuminated by fireworks during celebrations for the 100th anniversary of Naval Aviation. Moored on the River Thames in London, Illustrious visited the capital for 6 days culminating in a 50 aircraft flypast and the fireworks display.
Pictured is the Type 23 frigate HMS Iron Duke alongside in Portsmouth’s Naval Dockyard. HMS Iron Duke departed on 17th of June 2009 from Portsmouth, Hampshire. The Royal Navy ship has deployed for five months to the Caribbean, where she will undertake a variety of roles from Hurricane Relief to Counter Drugs Operations with the US Coast Guard.
Royal Navy Type 23 Frigate HMS Portland fires a Sea Wolf missile in the Gibraltar Exercise Areas.
Royal Navy Type 23 Frigate HMS Portland fires a Sea Wolf missile in the Gibraltar Exercise Areas.
Royal Navy Type 23 Frigate HMS Portland fires a Sea Wolf missile in the Gibraltar Exercise Areas.
Type 22 frigate HMS Cumberland (foreground) passes her sister ship HMS Cornwall in the Gulf of Aden, during operations in the region. These operations included counter-smuggling (arms and drugs), counter-terrorism and counter-piracy.
Royal Navy Type 22 frigate HMS Cumberland is pictured from above, in the Gulf of Aden as part of the United Kingdom’s contribution to maritime security in the region. These operations included counter-smuggling (arms and drugs), counter-terrorism and counter-piracy.
An Army Air Corps Apache attack helicopter takes off from the deck of the Royal Navy’s amphibious assault helicopter carrier HMS Ocean, the first to do so for 5 years. HMS Ocean was conducting training off the coast of Suffolk, enabling the helicopters to have a short journey back to their base at RAF Wattisham.
Royal Navy Type 22 frigate HMS Cornwall leads the way in company with HS Navarinon, USS Laboon, TCG Gediz and ITS Libeccio during counter piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden.
HMS Cornwall is pictured receiving stores by Merlin helicopter from HMS Ocean in the Gulf of Aden. Vertical Replenishment or Vertrep is a quick and convenient way of resupplying a ship at sea. The Royal Navy Type 22 frigate was conducting counter piracy operations in the area.
HMS Cornwall is pictured receiving stores by Merlin helicopter from HMS Ocean in the Gulf of Aden. Vertical Replenishment or Vertrep is a quick and convenient way of resupplying a ship at sea. The Royal Navy Type 22 frigate was conducting counter piracy operations in the area.
HMS Cornwall is pictured receiving stores by Merlin helicopter from HMS Ocean (top of picture) in the Gulf of Aden. Vertical Replenishment or Vertrep is a quick and convenient way of resupplying a ship at sea. The Royal Navy Type 22 frigate was conducting counter piracy operations in the area.
HMS Cornwall
HMS Cornwall is pictured sailing through some rough water in the Gulf of Aden. The Royal Navy Type 22 frigate was conducting counter piracy operations in the area at the time.
HMS Cornwall stops in the water to let her ships company enjoy a hands to bathe in the Indian Ocean. Hands to bathe allows sailors to relax after operational demands and freshen up with a swim. HMS Cornwall is currently deployed as the British contribution and Flagship to the Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2). The force of 5 including ships from Greece, Italy, United States and Turkey, fulfils a long standing commitment by NATO to maintain a visible deterent to piracy in the Gulf of Aden.
Royal Navy Type 22 frigate HMS Cumberland is photographed after passing sister ship HMS Cornwall during anti-piracy operations. HMS Cornwall is currently deployed as the British contribution and Flagship to the Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2). The force of 5 including ships from Greece, Italy, United States and Turkey, fulfils a long standing commitment by NATO to maintain a visible deterent to piracy in the Gulf of Aden.
Royal Navy submarine HMS Astute sails up the Clyde estuary into her home port of Faslane, Scotland for the first time following the journey from Barrow-in-Furness shipyard.
Escorted by tugs, Royal Navy submarine HMS Astute sails up the Clyde estuary into her home port of Faslane, Scotland for the first time following the journey from Barrow-in-Furness shipyard.
Royal Navy submarine HMS Astute sails up the Clyde estuary into her home port of Faslane, Scotland for the first time following the journey from Barrow-in-Furness shipyard.
Royal Navy submarine HMS Astute sails up the Clyde estuary into her home port of Faslane, Scotland for the first time following the journey from Barrow-in-Furness shipyard.
HMS Dauntless, the second of six formidable Type 45 air defence warships being built for the Royal Navy, arrives in her home port of Portsmouth, Hampshire for the first time. Built by BAE Systems, the Type 45 destroyer was launched in January 2007 from its Govan shipyard in Glasgow and since then has been carrying out sea trials in Scottish waters. The Type 45s are the largest and most powerful air defence destroyers ever built for the Royal Navy and all will be based in Portsmouth.
HMS Dauntless, the second of six formidable Type 45 air defence warships being built for the Royal Navy, arrives in her home port of Portsmouth, Hampshire for the first time. Built by BAE Systems, the Type 45 destroyer was launched in January 2007 from its Govan shipyard in Glasgow and since then has been carrying out sea trials in Scottish waters. The Type 45s are the largest and most powerful air defence destroyers ever built for the Royal Navy and all will be based in Portsmouth.
RFA Lyme Bay is pictured operating near Kuwait during a maritime capability and security demonstration. She is accompanied by HMS Chiddingfold Hunt-class mine countermeasure vessel (MCMV) seen in the background. Four Bay Class Large Amphibious Landing Ships have been ordered with the LSD(A) construction programme well advanced. The new ships displace 16,100 tonnes and replace RFAs Sir Galahad and Sir Tristram.
HMS Monmouth’s Merlin helicopter from 829 Squadron, is pictured firing her defensive aids during a night time exercise. These decoys are designed to confuse heat seeking missiles and are invaluable when operating over hostile areas.
HMS Monmouth’s Merlin helicopter from 829 Squadron, is pictured firing her defensive aids during a night time exercise. These decoys are designed to confuse heat seeking missiles and are invaluable when operating over hostile areas.
Type 45 destroyers together for the first time. HMS Daring (rear) and Dauntless (front) conduct Officer of the Watch manoeuvres south of the Isle of Wight. The Royal Navy’s two new formidable air defence destroyers performed side by side for the first time. The pair sailed at high speeds to simulate the defence of a high value warship and also put their communications equipment to the test as a warm up to intensive operational sea training later this year.
Type 22 frigate HMS Chatham is pictured at speed in the Mediterranean Sea enroute to the Gulf of Aden for counter piracy operations in the area.
Royal Navy submarine HMS Talent conducts surfacing drills in the Kyle of Lochalsh, Scotland in December 2009.
The Royal NavyÕs two newest warships formidable air defence destroyers HMS Daring (front) and HMS Dauntless, have performed side-by-side at sea for the first time. The Type 45 destroyers successfully completed a series of complex manoeuvres south of the Isle of Wight in February 2010.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Westminster is pictured in dry dock at HMNB Devonport.
HMS Scott sails into Port Lockroy, a natural harbour on the Antarctic Peninsula of the British Antarctic Territory during her deployment to the Antarctic. HMS Scott was on task in the Antarctic and providing logistical support to a wide range of environmental work including the review of a number of ASPAs (Antarctic Specially Protected Areas). This tasking was being carried out in parallel with HMS Scott’s hydrographical survey work, which was used to improve safe navigation of Antarctic waters.
Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal conducts a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with the supply vessel RFA Wave Knight in the North Sea.
Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal conducts a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with the supply vessel RFA Wave Knight in the North Sea.
Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal conducts a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with the supply vessel RFA Wave Knight in the North Sea.
Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal conducts a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) with the supply vessel RFA Wave Knight in the North Sea.
A Lynx helicopter from 815 Naval Air Squadron, is lowered on HMS Ark Royal’s aircraft lift to the hangar from the flight deck.
HMS Ark Royal is pictured operating off the east coast of the UK. The Portsmouth based carrier was undergoing the next phase of her workup in becoming the Nations Strike Carrier in 2010.
HMS Ark Royal is pictured participating during an Amphibious Exercise off the Eastern coast of the United States in 2008. She is the fifth vessel to bear the proud name. Ark Royal
HMS Ark Royal is pictured participating in an Amphibious Exercise off the Eastern coast of the United States in 2008. She is the fifth vessel to bear the proud name. Ark Royal was built by Swan Hunters Ship Builders’ yard at Wallsend in December 1978 and launched by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.
HMS Ark Royal is pictured participating in an Amphibious Exercise off the Eastern coast of the United States in 2008. She is the fifth vessel to bear the proud name. Ark Royal was built by Swan Hunters Ship Builders’ yard at Wallsend in December 1978 and launched by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.
HMS Ocean at anchor during Exercise Cold Response. The ship’s primary role is to carry an Embarked Military Force (EMF) supported by 12 medium support helicopters, 6 attack helicopters and 4 Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) Mk 5 Landing Craft. Her secondary roles include afloat training, a limited anti-submarine warfare (ASW) platform and a base for anti-terrorist operations. HMS Ocean is the sixth ship to bear the name, the most recent being a Light Fleet Carrier also built on the Clyde and commissioned on 30 June 1945.
HMS Ocean at anchor during Exercise Cold Response. The ship’s primary role is to carry an Embarked Military Force (EMF) supported by 12 medium support helicopters, 6 attack helicopters and 4 Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) Mk 5 Landing Craft. Her secondary roles include afloat training, a limited anti-submarine warfare (ASW) platform and a base for anti-terrorist operations. HMS Ocean is the sixth ship to bear the name, the most recent being a Light Fleet Carrier also built on the Clyde and commissioned on 30 June 1945.
HMS Ocean at anchor during Exercise Cold Response. The ship’s primary role is to carry an Embarked Military Force (EMF) supported by 12 medium support helicopters, 6 attack helicopters and 4 Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) Mk 5 Landing Craft. Her secondary roles include afloat training, a limited anti-submarine warfare (ASW) platform and a base for anti-terrorist operations. HMS Ocean is the sixth ship to bear the name, the most recent being a Light Fleet Carrier also built on the Clyde and commissioned on 30 June 1945.
HMS Albion is pictured at sea during Exercise Cold Response near Norway in February 2010. The Albion Class, Landing Platform Dock ships (LPD) primary function is to embark, transport, and deploy and recover (by air and sea) troops and their equipment, vehicles and miscellaneous cargo, forming part of an Amphibious Assault Force.
HMS Albion conducts amphibious operations with Landing Craft Utility (LCU) during Exercise Grey Heron off the coast of Portsmouth in 2007. The Albion Class, Landing Platform Dock ships (LPD) primary function is to embark, transport, and deploy and recover (by air and sea) troops and their equipment, vehicles and miscellaneous cargo, forming part of an Amphibious Assault Force.
A Harrier aircraft from the Naval Strike Wing (NSW) onboard HMS Ark Royal is raised on a hangar lift ready for operations, onboard HMS Ark Royal. The NSW were embarked aboard Ark Royal in support of the carrier’s ‘Safe To Operate’ phase, the aim of which was to enable successful embarkation in preparation for Operation Joint Warrior.
A Kuwaiti Super Puma conducts winching from the deck of HMS Atherstone in the Middle East. The Hunt Class are the largest warships ever constructed out of Glass Reinforced Plastic. Although orginally built as dual purpose Minesweepers and Minehunters, the class are currently configured to function only in the Minehunter role. As Minehunters they ‘hunt’ for mines with a high definition sonar and then destroy them using explosives placed either by the Mine Clearance Divers or by the Sea Fox Mine Disposal System . In addition they are equiped with: a single 30mm gun, two Miniguns and three General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMGs). This equipment fit enables the Hunt class to function in a Secondary Role as very potent patrol Craft.
Hunt Class vessel HMS Atherstone (foreground) and HMS Grimsby operating together in the Middle East. The Hunt Class are the largest warships ever constructed out of Glass Reinforced Plastic. Although orginally built as dual purpose Minesweepers and Minehunters, the class are currently configured to function only in the Minehunter role. As Minehunters they ‘hunt’ for mines with a high definition sonar and then destroy them using explosives placed either by the Mine Clearance Divers or by the Sea Fox Mine Disposal System . In addition they are equiped with: a single 30mm gun, two Miniguns and three General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMGs). This equipment fit enables the Hunt class to function in a Secondary Role as very potent patrol Craft.
Mine counter measure vessel HMS Atherstone operating in the Middle East. The Hunt Class are the largest warships ever constructed out of Glass Reinforced Plastic. Although orginally built as dual purpose Minesweepers and Minehunters, the class are currently configured to function only in the Minehunter role. As Minehunters they ‘hunt’ for mines with a high definition sonar and then destroy them using explosives placed either by the Mine Clearance Divers or by the Sea Fox Mine Disposal System . In addition they are equiped with: a single 30mm gun, two Miniguns and three General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMGs). This equipment fit enables the Hunt class to function in a Secondary Role as very potent patrol Craft.
HMS Archer is a University Royal Naval Unit (URNU) patrol vessel based in Aberdeen. She is a 20 metre P2000 Fast Patrol Boat, built by Watercraft in 1985. There is accommodation for 12 people on board, as well as a good navigational fit of radar, GPS, Decca, and gyro compass. Each year she spends three weeks at Easter in the Western Isles and seven weeks in the Summer deployed to Europe and the UK in company with the other URNU training vessels.
Type 42 destroyer HMS Liverpool is pictured during Exercise Joint Warrior. HMS Liverpool is the tenth of the class of Type 42 Destroyers and the seventh ship to bear the name. She was built by Cammell Laird of Birkenhead and was launched on 25 September 1980 by Lady Strathcona, wife of the then Minister of State for Defence.
HMS Liverpool (front) escorts HMS Ark Royal during Exercise Joint Warrior. HMS Liverpool is the tenth of the class of Type 42 Destroyers and the seventh ship to bear the name. She was built by Cammell Laird of Birkenhead and was launched on 25 September 1980 by Lady Strathcona, wife of the then Minister of State for Defence.
HMS Liverpool is the tenth of the class of Type 42 Destroyers and the seventh ship to bear the name. She was built by Cammell Laird of Birkenhead and was launched on 25 September 1980 by Lady Strathcona, wife of the then Minister of State for Defence.
Royal Navy Type 42 destroyer HMS Manchester is pictured operating in the Atlantic Ocean near Gibraltar. HMS Manchester is the third ship to bear the name and was launched on the 24 November 1980. On her funnel she carries a bee which is taken from the coat of arms of the City of Manchester, signifying industry and endeavour. She has battle honours from Norway and Spartivento, in 1940, the Arctic and the Malta convoys in 1942 and the Persian Gulf in 1991.
A Lynx helicopter from HMS Manchester, deploys her counter heat-seeking missile flares during an exercise at sea.
The Royal Navy’s oldest commissioned vessel, Lord Nelson’s flagship HMS Victory, is pictured in her permanent berth at Portsmouth Naval Base. In the background is the RN’s latest warship, Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless.
HMS Clyde is seen leaving Portsmouth, bound for the South Atlantic. HMS Clyde, the NavyÕs new Falkland Islands patrol vessel, will stay in the region for at least five years. Changeover crews will be flown to the Falklands every six months and maintenance will be carried out Ôin theatreÕ. Clyde replaced Falklands patrol ship HMS Dumbarton Castle which returned before decommissioning.
HMS Clyde is seen leaving Portsmouth bound for the South Atlantic. HMS Clyde, the Royal Navy’s new Falkland Islands patrol vessel, will stay in the region for at least five years. Changeover crews will be flown to the Falklands every six months and maintenance will be carried out ‘in theatre’. Clyde replaced Falklands patrol ship HMS Dumbarton Castle which returned before decommissioning.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll. The 3rd Royal Navy ship to bear the name, she is also the 3rd of the Royal Navy’s Duke class frigates and was commissioned on 30 May 1991. She was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders in Glasgow to a revolutionary design with a superstructure shaped to minimise radar reflections and to make the ship as small as a fishing boat on the enemy’s radar, and with engines so quiet as to be inaudible, HMS Argyll represents the latest in naval technology. The Ship’s Company is small, only 180 people although each one trained to be proficient in high-tech maritime warfare, whether controlling the engines or firing missiles.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll. The 3rd Royal Navy ship to bear the name, she is also the 3rd of the Royal Navy’s Duke class frigates and was commissioned on 30 May 1991. She was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders in Glasgow to a revolutionary design with a superstructure shaped to minimise radar reflections and to make the ship as small as a fishing boat on the enemy’s radar, and with engines so quiet as to be inaudible, HMS Argyll represents the latest in naval technology. The Ship’s Company is small, only 180 people although each one trained to be proficient in high-tech maritime warfare, whether controlling the engines or firing missiles.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll. The 3rd Royal Navy ship to bear the name, she is also the 3rd of the Royal Navy’s Duke class frigates and was commissioned on 30 May 1991. She was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders in Glasgow to a revolutionary design with a superstructure shaped to minimise radar reflections and to make the ship as small as a fishing boat on the enemy’s radar, and with engines so quiet as to be inaudible, HMS Argyll represents the latest in naval technology. The Ship’s Company is small, only 180 people although each one trained to be proficient in high-tech maritime warfare, whether controlling the engines or firing missiles.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll is pictured pulling away from USS Kearsage, following a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) in the Middle East. The 3rd Royal Navy ship to bear the name, she is also the 3rd of the Royal Navy’s Duke class frigates and was commissioned on 30 May 1991. She was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders in Glasgow to a revolutionary design with a superstructure shaped to minimise radar reflections and to make the ship as small as a fishing boat on the enemy’s radar, and with engines so quiet as to be inaudible, HMS Argyll represents the latest in naval technology. The Ship’s Company is small, only 180 people although each one trained to be proficient in high-tech maritime warfare, whether controlling the engines or firing missiles.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll is pictured firing her 4.5″ gun during an exercise in the Middle East. The 3rd Royal Navy ship to bear the name, she is also the 3rd of the Royal Navy’s Duke class frigates and was commissioned on 30 May 1991. She was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders in Glasgow to a revolutionary design with a superstructure shaped to minimise radar reflections and to make the ship as small as a fishing boat on the enemy’s radar, and with engines so quiet as to be inaudible, HMS Argyll represents the latest in naval technology. The Ship’s Company is small, only 180 people although each one trained to be proficient in high-tech maritime warfare, whether controlling the engines or firing missiles.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Kent. Built by BAe Systems (formerly Yarrow Shipbuilders) at Scotstoun on the River Clyde, the current HMS Kent is the twelfth ship to bear the name. Launched in May 1998 by her Sponsor, HRH Princess Alexandra, the Ship’s Company is very proud of her distinguished history within the Royal Navy. The first HMS Kent was commissioned in 1650, and since then there have only been 60 years cumulatively where there has not been an HMS Kent in the Navy. An impressive 16 Battle Honors earned by her predecessors, mean that the Ship is able to live up to her motto ‘Invicta’, the Latin for ‘Unconquerable’, which has almost as much history as the Ship herself. In 1066 when William the Conquerer was consolidating his newly-gained power in England, he marched south towards Kent from London. To repel the invading Normans, the men of Kent used the ÔOld OakÕ wood in their trees to create the noise in the forests of a much larger army than there actually was, fooling the invading forces into creating a treaty which allowed the King of Kent to retain certain privileges and traditions. HMS Kent still honours this link when sailing into ports in Kent, by flying a bow of holme oak from the yardarm.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Kent. Built by BAe Systems (formerly Yarrow Shipbuilders) at Scotstoun on the River Clyde, the current HMS Kent is the twelfth ship to bear the name. Launched in May 1998 by her Sponsor, HRH Princess Alexandra,
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Kent. Built by BAe Systems (formerly Yarrow Shipbuilders) at Scotstoun on the River Clyde, the current HMS Kent is the twelfth ship to bear the name. Launched in May 1998 by her Sponsor, HRH Princess Alexandra,
American Nimitz class aircraft carrier USS Harry S Truman is pictured during flying operations in the company of HMS Somerset in the Mediterranean. HMS Somerset was perforing anti-submarine duties for the immense vessel at the the time.
Type 23 frigate HMS Richmond is pictured firing her Harpoon anti-ship missile system. Fitted to the Batch III Type 22 frigates and the Type 23 frigates, the Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) Harpoon is a sophisticated anti-ship missile using a combination of inertial guidance and active radar homing to attack targets out to a range of 130km. Cruising at Mach 0.9 and carrying a 227kg warhead it is powered by a lightweight turbojet, but is accelerated at launch by a booster rocket. A submarine launched version, known as Sub Harpoon, is also in service aboard the Swiftsure and Trafalgar class SSNs.
Type 23 frigate HMS Iron Duke is pictured firing her Harpoon anti-ship missile system. Fitted to the Batch III Type 22 frigates and the Type 23 frigates, the Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) Harpoon is a sophisticated anti-ship missile using a combination of inertial guidance and active radar homing to attack targets out to a range of 130km. Cruising at Mach 0.9 and carrying a 227kg warhead it is powered by a lightweight turbojet, but is accelerated at launch by a booster rocket. A submarine launched version, known as Sub Harpoon, is also in service aboard the Swiftsure and Trafalgar class SSNs.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Somerset is pictured on operations in the Arabian Gulf. HMS Somerset is deployed to the area for 6 months, to participate in Operation TELIC and specifically, to provide security to Iraqi offshore oil infrastructure vital to the Iraqi economy and the reconstruction effort of the coalition campaign. During her deployment, Somerset will also support Operation ACTIVE ENDEAVOUR in the Mediterranean, providing reassurance and reinforcing freedom of navigation and conduct counter piracy operations of the Horn of Africa. She will also participate in a variety of multi-national exercises and support UK strategic interests in the Middle East.
Image shows assault craft with Royal Marines embarked exiting the stern of HMS Albion during amphibious operations off North Carolina, USA. Ships gathered over several days for Auriga 10 in the Western Atlantic.
HMS Portland comes face to face with the remarkable size of the Nordenskjold Glacier in South Georgia. HMS Portland paid a reassurance visit to South Georgia, a remote UK Territory in the Southern Ocean. South Georgia is a pristine natural reserve where the first shots of the Falklands War were fired in 1982. The island was formerly used for a number of whaling stations until the industry’s demise in the 1960’s. HMS Portland is currently deployed for 7 months on Atlantic Patrol Task (South) (ATP(S)) where she will reassure UK overseas territories, Commonwealth and other friendly nations.
HMS Portland comes face to face with the remarkable size of the Nordenskjold Glacier in South Georgia. HMS Portland paid a reassurance visit to South Georgia, a remote UK Territory in the Southern Ocean. South Georgia is a pristine natural reserve where the first shots of the Falklands War were fired in 1982. The island was formerly used for a number of whaling stations until the industry’s demise in the 1960’s. HMS Portland is currently deployed for 7 months on Atlantic Patrol Task (South) (ATP(S)) where she will reassure UK overseas territories, Commonwealth and other friendly nations.
HMS Portland comes face to face with the remarkable size of the Nordenskjold Glacier in South Georgia. HMS Portland paid a reassurance visit to South Georgia, a remote UK Territory in the Southern Ocean. South Georgia is a pristine natural reserve where the first shots of the Falklands War were fired in 1982. The island was formerly used for a number of whaling stations until the industry’s demise in the 1960’s. HMS Portland is currently deployed for 7 months on Atlantic Patrol Task (South) (ATP(S)) where she will reassure UK overseas territories, Commonwealth and other friendly nations.
HMS Portland comes face to face with the remarkable size of the Nordenskjold Glacier in South Georgia. HMS Portland paid a reassurance visit to South Georgia, a remote UK Territory in the Southern Ocean. South Georgia is a pristine natural reserve where the first shots of the Falklands War were fired in 1982. The island was formerly used for a number of whaling stations until the industry’s demise in the 1960’s. HMS Portland is currently deployed for 7 months on Atlantic Patrol Task (South) (ATP(S)) where she will reassure UK overseas territories, Commonwealth and other friendly nations.
HMS Portland comes face to face with the remarkable size of the Nordenskjold Glacier in South Georgia. HMS Portland paid a reassurance visit to South Georgia, a remote UK Territory in the Southern Ocean. South Georgia is a pristine natural reserve where the first shots of the Falklands War were fired in 1982. The island was formerly used for a number of whaling stations until the industry’s demise in the 1960’s. HMS Portland is currently deployed for 7 months on Atlantic Patrol Task (South) (ATP(S)) where she will reassure UK overseas territories, Commonwealth and other friendly nations.
HMS Portland comes face to face with the remarkable size of the Nordenskjold Glacier in South Georgia and local wildlife. HMS Portland paid a reassurance visit to South Georgia, a remote UK Territory in the Southern Ocean. South Georgia is a pristine natural reserve where the first shots of the Falklands War were fired in 1982. The island was formerly used for a number of whaling stations until the industry’s demise in the 1960’s. HMS Portland is currently deployed for 7 months on Atlantic Patrol Task (South) (ATP(S)) where she will reassure UK overseas territories, Commonwealth and other friendly nations.
Pictured is HMS Mersey, a River Class Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) used mainly for Fishery Protection duties.
Trafalgar Class submarine SSN (Ship Submersible Nuclear) HMS Triumph, glides into HM Naval Base Clyde in the early morning sun following a patrol. The Triumph of today is somewhat different from her predecessors. Built by VSEL at Barrow-in-Furness, she was commissioned in October 1991 and is the seventh and last of the Trafalgar class. Since commissioning, the submarine has completed a number of notable patrols from the North Atlantic to the Far East. Between 2005 and 2009, Triumph went through a long overhaul period to refuel the reactor, complete essential maintenance and repairs. During this long overhaul period, the vessel’s equipment and sensors were upgraded to make her one of the most potent and advanced submarines in the flotilla.
Trafalgar Class submarine SSN (Ship Submersible Nuclear) HMS Triumph, glides into HM Naval Base Clyde in the early morning sun following a patrol. The Triumph of today is somewhat different from her predecessors. Built by VSEL at Barrow-in-Furness, she was commissioned in October 1991 and is the seventh and last of the Trafalgar class. Since commissioning, the submarine has completed a number of notable patrols from the North Atlantic to the Far East. Between 2005 and 2009, Triumph went through a long overhaul period to refuel the reactor, complete essential maintenance and repairs. During this long overhaul period, the vessel’s equipment and sensors were upgraded to make her one of the most potent and advanced submarines in the flotilla.
Trafalgar Class submarine SSN (Ship Submersible Nuclear) HMS Triumph, glides into HM Naval Base Clyde in the early morning sun following a patrol. The Triumph of today is somewhat different from her predecessors. Built by VSEL at Barrow-in-Furness, she was commissioned in October 1991 and is the seventh and last of the Trafalgar class. Since commissioning, the submarine has completed a number of notable patrols from the North Atlantic to the Far East. Between 2005 and 2009, Triumph went through a long overhaul period to refuel the reactor, complete essential maintenance and repairs. During this long overhaul period, the vessel’s equipment and sensors were upgraded to make her one of the most potent and advanced submarines in the flotilla.
Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Northumberland is pictured in the Indian Ocean whilst conducting Counter-Piracy Operations.
Type 45 destroyer HMS Dragon is pictured from HMS Ark Royal during sea trials off the coast of Scotland. HMS Dragon will join HM Ships Daring and Diamond on acceptance to the Fleet following successful completion of the trials.
A port beam view of the British frigate HMS ANDROMEDA (F-57) underway off the coast of Liberia.
hms BELFAST
hms southampton
Port side view of the Royal Navy Type 42 Class Destroyer HMS SOUTHAMPTON (D-90) (foreground) and the Nimitz Class Aircraft Carrier USS JOHN C. STENNIS (CVN 74) underway in the Arabian Sea in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM.
The British Royal Navy, Type 42 Class Destroyer, HMS NOTTINGHAM (D91), steaming in the Persian Gulf in support of the Southwest Asia build up.
A port side view of the tank landing ship HMS SIR PERCIVALE (L-3036) tied up to the jetty at the Portsmouth Naval Base.
A starboard bow view of the Type 23 guided missile frigate HMS WESTMINSTER (F-237) tied up to the jetty in the east basin of the Portsmouth Naval Base.
A bow on view of the Type 23 guided missile frigate HMS WESTMINSTER (F-237) tied up to the jetty in the east basin of the Portsmouth Naval Base.
The bow port view of the Royal Navy Type 42 Class (DDG) Destroyer Her MajestyÕs Ship (HMS) EDINBURGH (D 97) underway.
A port bow view of the Type 42A guided missile destroyer HMS GLASGOW (D-88) tied up to the jetty at the Portsmouth Naval Base.
A port quarter view of the Type 42B guided missile destroyer HMS CARDIFF (D-108) tied up to the jetty at the Portsmouth Naval Base.
A port side view of the United Kingdom type 42B guided missile destroyer HMS EXETER (D-89) laying to in the Fjord. The ship is taking part in NATO Exercise Teamwork ’92.
A starboard bow view of the Type 42B guided missile destroyer HMS SOUTHAMPTON (D-90) tied up at the north corner of the jetty at the Portsmouth Naval Base.
American warship USS Ticonderoga fires a Harpoon Missile during an exercise.

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